Continuous Bias Binding

Continuous Bias Binding

Continuous Bias Binding

When making a separate binding for your quilt, continuous bias binding is the way to go.  You can maneuver the binding more easily around corners, and it’s an economical way to use up leftover fabric from your quilt top.

Cut a square of fabric.  I used 15″ x 15″.  Cut this square on the diagonal.

Making Bias Triangles

Making Bias Triangles

Make a parallelogram with your two pieces.  (And you thought Algebra was useless!)  Taking your bottom triangle and moving it to the top of your top triangle WITHOUT turning either piece creates a parallelogram.  Sew the seam where they join.

Using a ruler, mark off lines spaced evenly.  A typical width for binding a quilt is 2.5″.  My project called for 2″ so that’s what’s depicted in my photos.

2" Lines on Parallelogram

2″ Lines on Parallelogram

You will now make a tube but offset the lines you just drew by one.  After offsetting and pinning the first line from one side with the second line from the other side, pin each intersecting line.  This will seem a little awkward at first, but it does work!  Sew the tube.

Offset Lines While Making Tube

Offset Lines While Making Tube

Now you will cut on the lines you drew.  As you’re cutting, your tube will spiral out in a perfect continuous bias binding!

Cutting Bias

Cutting Bias

My 15″ square yielded approximately 80″ of binding.  Your length will vary depending on the width you are making.

Continuous Bias

Continuous Bias

Please make sure to pass on this information to fellow quilters!  For years I’d call Mom and she’d walk me through it.  It’s finally stuck, and I hope it does for you as well.

 

 

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  1. […] explain in a little more detail.  When I bind quilts, I make the bias binding and sew it right sides together on the front of my quilt.  Before I fold the binding to the back […]

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